Student Spotlight

Fort Hays State University undergraduate students play a big role in ongoing paleontology collection projects at the Museum. Because of the two National Science Foundation grants awarded to the paleontology department, there are four undergraduate students funded to help with digitizing and archiving fossil specimens and specimen data. As the school year comes to a close, we would like to take the opportunity to acknowledge these students and thank them for their dedication.

Jehoiada “J.D.” Schmidt is a 4th year Biology/Wildlife Biology major who is also pursuing a Justice Studies minor. Although he is more interested in a career working with live animals, he says “working in the paleontology collection has exposed me to an area of biology that I had not really considered very much (dealing with dead things), and has shown me how amazing and diverse the species of this world truly are!”

Kelsey Mills is currently a junior Geosciences major interested in a career in paleontology. Museum work is a big part of the world paleontology, and Kelsey’s experiences have led her to “an understanding of how museum collections are run, and how to fully operate a museums data base. It has also allowed me to put what I have learned in the classroom to good use.” After FHSU, Kelsey hopes to study hadrosaur dinosaurs paleobiology in graduate school.
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Hannah Horinek is a sophomore Geosciences student who plans to pursue a graduate degree studying paleontology. For Hannah, “working in the collections is like a dream come true! I love getting to come in every day and help advance the Sternberg toward our goal of digitizing the Cretaceous specimens; it really fills me with a sense of purpose.” Even though she spends her days working with Cretaceous fish, she is interested in researching Devonian fish when she gets to graduate school.

Amelia Growe is a senior Biology major interested in entomology (insects). Though her academic interests are outside of paleontology, she has embraced museum work. “The Sternberg has given me valuable work experience and helped me develop professionally. Contributing to the iDigBio digitization effort is something I take pride in.” After graduating, she will pursue her Master’s degree in Biology at FHSU.  Her research will focus on mosquitos.
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Fossil Revival

Specimen collections form the backbone of exhibits, education, and research at a natural history museum. The most complete and well-preserved specimens are usually the ones highlighted in exhibits, while fragmented and incomplete specimens are held in collection rooms behind the scenes.  The latter specimens may not be pretty or obvious as to which animal or plant they represent, but they are still important to preserve.  A biologist wouldn’t study just one meadow lark to understand everything about the entire species, and a paleontologist wouldn’t want to study just one Pteranodon fossil to try to understand everything about pterosaurs. So, scientists collect many specimens – including partial and fragmented specimens – hoping to form as accurate a picture as possible about these animals and how they lived. Additionally, we use these specimens to train students of all ages in the process of science, we show them off during tours, and we share relevant information and images online for public access.
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Of course, the easiest way for the public to learn about our specimen collections is through interpretive exhibits. Visitors not only see what ancient and modern plants, animals, and ecosystems look like, but can learn about the research done on those organisms. Exhibits are a great way for scientists to share their research.  Pictured here is a Niobrarasaurus dinosaur skeleton being laid out for a new exhibit being constructed at the Sternberg Museum. By designing this exhibit, we have the opportunity to showcase specimens that have never been on display or have not been on display recently.  And we are also able to share new research undertaken by FHSU students, faculty, and staff on some of our fantastic fossils.

 

Life as a Geoscientist

ByrdDataVisualizaitonEntryCongratulations to Paleontology Collections Manager Christina Byrd for her award-winning photo! Representing the Paleontology Department, Christina entered photos from her work at the Museum in the American Geosciences Institute’s “Life as a Geoscientist” photo contest. The photo titled “Bringing fossils into the digital age” won first place in the “Data Visualization” category. It shows two Fort Hays Department of Geosciences students photographing a fossil clam shell encrusted with oysters. Graduate student Amber Michels (left) and undergraduate student Hannah Horinek (right) both work on a National Science Foundation grant awarded to the Sternberg Museum to digitize Cretaceous fossils; images and data collected over the course of this project will be available online. Cheers to Christina, Amber, Hannah, and the five other students working on data digitization and visualization in the paleontology collection!

National Fossil Day with NSF

To celebrate National Fossil Day (October 11, 2017), the National Science Foundation featured four paleontologists on its social media accounts and on Science360 Radio. Dr. Laura Wilson was one of the featured scientists.  Her and Sternberg Museum Adjunct Curator Mike Everhart’s recent Science Friday segment was featured on the air, and pictures of her research were shared across social media platforms. Laura currently has two National Science Foundation grants to support the paleontology collections at the Sternberg Museum.

NSF Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/US.NSF/posts/10155566238757900

NSF Twitter: https://twitter.com/NSF/status/919190210910531585

NSF tumblr: http://nationalsciencefoundation.tumblr.com/post/166433503138/fossils-hunting-in-the-kansas-sea

NSF Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsfgov/

Two images include fieldwork with Quinter High School students in the Late Cretaceous Smoky Hill Chalk (Niobrara Formation) in Western Kansas.  Laura and students from the Advanced Biology class (along with their teacher) excavated a mosasaur fossil in the spring of 2014.  The third image is of the internal bone structure of a Hesperornis leg bone from the Arctic.

We can’t think of a better way to celebrate National Fossil Day than with Fort Hays State University paleontologists!

Sternberg scientists hit the airwaves!

SciFri

Though it may not be news to paleontologists and visitors to the Sternberg Museum, not everyone in the country knows that Kansas was covered by an ocean 85 million years. To address this, Sternberg paleontologists had the opportunity to take to a national stage and talk about the ocean that covered Kansas in the Cretaceous. On Friday September 15th, Chief Curator/Curator of Paleontology Dr. Laura Wilson and Adjunct Curator of Paleontology Mike Everhart appeared on public radio’s Science Friday. The Saturday before, they recorded their segment at Wichita’s Orpheum Theater in front of a sold-out studio audience. Fielding question from host Ira Flatow and the audience, Laura and Mike discussed the paleontological history of Kansas, the Western Interior Seaway that covered Kansas, and the extinct animals that filled the sea. They also got to touch on subjects close to their research. Mike has studied many of the vertebrate groups that lived in this Cretaceous Seaway and is known as a mosasaur expert. Laura studies the seabirds that lived in the Seaway and works on putting together the ancient ecosystem structure. If you missed it, the segment is available online.